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Submitt an article

Guide lines

The Law Review will publish articles, case comments, and book reviews. The submitted text will first be read by the Editor-in-Chief, and if deemed of academic standards will be sent for peer-review. Upon review, the evaluator will either recommend the publication because of its contribution to the advancement of knowledge in the field of language law or will explain why it should not be published. In such a case, it will be sent to the author(s) with the evaluator's comments. If approved, the text will be formatted and published.

The Language Law Review will mainly publish articles in French but will also accept to publish a few articles in another language, as long as the ratio does not exceed 20% of the published articles in a year, and that they are accompanied preferably by a French or English abstract. The Law Review reserves the right to make grammar corrections, as well as modifications to the form of the text and references. There will be no substantial modifications made to the text without the author's consent. All texts must be sent in Word format at info@droitslinguistiques.ca.

Copyright

The author(s) who accepts to publish in the Language Law Review hereby grant implicitly to the International Observatory on Language Rights a licence to publish the text. The sole aim of the licence is to grant permission to the International Observatory on Language Rights to reproduce the text. The authors do not assign or transfer any rights they have on the text. Click here to view our disclaimer.

Summary

All texts should have a summary which will be published with the text. As for text written and published in another language than French, the summary, in addition to being in the written language of the text, should be in French or English.

Translation

Translation of texts can be submitted by the authors for publication in the Language Law Review.

References and footnotes

As for texts submitted from Canada, references and footnotes should be written in accordance with the most recent edition of the Canadian Guide to Uniform Legal Citation (known as the McGill guide). As for texts submitted from outside Canada, references should be written in a coherent manner. Footnotes are preferred as oppose to endnotes.

The reference of the Language Law Review will be like any other printed law review: Name, "title" (2014) 1 RDL 38. Page numbers will also follow the ones from the previous published text, as they would in a printed review. At the end of the year, the volume in PDF format will be completed and published in a single document.