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The idea behind the Language Law Review

Michel Doucet

Part of the mission of the Faculty of Law of Université de Moncton has always been to conduct and disseminate research in the field of language law. Given that the Faculty is located in the only officially bilingual province in Canada, this mission is a natural fit.

Canada and New Brunswick both adopted their first Official Languages Act in 1969. In 1982, the language guarantees found in these statutes were constitutionally entrenched in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedom. In 1993, New Brunswick gave even further recognition to these rights by officialising, at section 16.1 of the Charter, the equality of status of both official linguistic communities.

The International Observatory on Language Rights was created in 2010 by the Faculty of Law of Université de Moncton. Its mandate is "to develop, support and promote language rights training and research in programs offered by the Faculty of Law of Université de Moncton, as well as at provincial, national and international levels."

Since its beginning, the Observatory has indeed made its presence felt in Canada as well as abroad. To name but a few of its numerous activities, the Observatory has organised and participated in numerous conferences, published conference proceedings, and directed the third edition of the collective work Les droits linguistiques au Canada (Language Rights in Canada). While the Observatory is very proud of these accomplishments, it keenly felt the lack of a publication tool in the field of language rights. The Language Law Review is designed to fill that void. Like most academic reviews and journals, the articles submitted for publication will be reviewed by peers in order to guarantee scientific relevance and rigour. The Language Law Review will however differ from other reviews in three ways: it will only be published in digital format, its articles will be published on an ad hoc basis throughout the year, and it will be available free of charge on our Website.

Before the creation of the Language Law Review, most articles written about language law were published in the Revue de la common law en français. Since the latter is no longer published, articles on the subject are now disseminated here and there in general reviews or journals. Hence, there is clearly a requirement for a review solely dedicated to language law.

Given its status of research center in the Faculty of Law of Université de Moncton, the Observatory will mainly publish articles written in French in its Language Law Review. However, since the Observatory is also an international research center, it will also publish articles written in other languages.

The Observatory firmly believes that the Language Law Review will play an important role in the advancement of knowledge in the field of language law in Canada and elsewhere in the world. Since its success depends on you, our only wish is that you share in our belief!