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Current events
Report on the Revision of the Official Languages Act
The International Observatory on Language Rights, in collaboration with the Canadian Institute for Research on Linguistic Minorities, presents this report on the revision of the Official Languages Act of New Brunswick. Prepared by Michel Doucet, professor emeritus of Law and former director of the Observatory, this report outlines the principles guiding the interpretation of language rights and proposes several modifications to the Actnotably concerning judicial bilingualism, communication and services, healthcare, professional associations, and the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages.
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Call for submissions - Sixth Volume of the Language Law Review
CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS
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For the sixth volume of the Language Law Review

The Language Law Review is an academic journal published by the International Observatory on Language Rights, a research centre at the Faculty of Law at the Université de Moncton. The Review is currently accepting submissions for original texts exploring language rights, in their general sense (the rights of linguistic and cultural minorities, the regulation of linguistic matters through legal means, as well as any other question relating to the relationship between law and language), and related socio-legal issues. The Review welcomes a diversity of methodological approaches, including inter- and pluri-disciplinary, comparative, and critical positivist approaches, and publishes articles on all legal systems, in Canada or elsewhere in the world. The Review publishes articles in both French and English.
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«Towards an Account of Linguistic Equality»
Le Directeur de l’Observatoire international des droits linguistiques, le professeur Érik Labelle Eastaugh, a publié un article dans le Osgood Hall Law Journal. 

«?The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms contains not one but two kinds of equality rights—general equality rights, set out in section 15, and linguistic equality rights, set out in sections 16 to 23—but the relationship between them is not well understood. Do official language rights rest on a distinct set of values, or do they simply instantiate the same general principle expressed in section 15?
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